Japanese martial arts sports background

Sumo

The national sport of Japan (although no official announcement has been made), which is always considered a feature, is Japan’s national essence of sumo.

Deeply rooted in Japanese culture, sumo has a history of more than 1500 years. Legend has it that the Japanese existence was the result of a sumo match between the gods, and actually sumo originated as a form of Shinto ritual. Although it has evolved into a professional sport, the elements of these rituals are still clear, from the use of salt to cleaning the ring, to the roof like a temple hung on.
The Sumo tournament, or Basho, takes place every two months in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Fukuoka and is a really great way to spend the day here. Although the pre-game antics were very rigorous and formalized, the battles were a spectacular reflection of the noise and energy when the two men were as big as the mountains try to pull, push each other out of the ring or be their super big foot.

Despite the quintessence of Japan, in recent times the number of foreign wrestlers has gradually increased and more and more non-Japanese people excel in sports and combinations of Cultural traditions bring.

Take a bento box, grab a beer and cheer on the crowd as they take their favorite Rikishi spirit to victory!

Kendo

The sport is quite lively and dangerous as kendo is perhaps Japan’s oldest martial art and has a combination of strength, skill and courage.

Kendo can be described in general as the “Japanese fence”, although the “swords” are crafted today from four large bamboo bars, often held together by leather straps. Its origin lies in the Kamakura period (1185-1333) with samurai who need to practice their swordsmanship.
They established the “kenjutsu” school for this purpose, and with the influence of Zen Buddhism, it brought about a good spirit as well as inner health. Over time, the sword was replaced with bamboo sticks, and thick, protective armor was introduced. Today kendo is introduced throughout Japan and is a sport for all ages involved.

Karate

Although it is one of the most famous martial arts in the world, the karate start is quite fuzzy. Commonly to Japanese people, the first precursor of karate is thought to originate very far from the Indian Subcontinent.

From there it was transmitted to China, where it was developed and had a refinement. Chinese merchants brought combat skills to the Ryukyu Islands in the early fourteenth century. Now included in what is called Okinawa, Japan’s southernmost district, the Ryukyu Islands were once an independent kingdom with a culture completely different from Japan. The karate that we know today has developed.

Katori kendo: Japanese cultural heritage

Founded by Monk Iizasa Ienao in 1960, Katori Shinto-ryu was the first martial art officially recognized as an intangible cultural heritage of Japan.
Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū (天 真正 伝 香 取 神道 流) is one of the three original sects of Japanese martial arts. Katori is one of Japan’s oldest remaining martial arts and is a model of Japanese traditional martial arts.
Katori Shinto-ryu is a comprehensive martial art that has existed and has been handed down since ancient times. Up to now, the tradition of transmission has been kept secret through strict regulations recorded in the blood (keppan) that members who want to join must perform. Over 600 years of existence, this ritual has contributed to preserving the quality of the traditional practice in both spirit and form as it was when founded by Iizasa Ienao.

Complete martial arts

Unlike the modern budo that focuses only on a certain technical school, the tradition of Katori Shinto-ryu is a comprehensive field study of martial arts. The content of this way of learning can be exactly called bugei juhappan (“martial arts practice” – perfecting martial arts study). Although today’s subjects such as suiren (swimming), hojutsu (shooting), kyujutsu (archery) no longer exist in the sect system, the textbook of Katori Shinto-ryu can still be called comprehensive, even even knowledge of ninjutsu (espionage) and noroshi (fire signal) is still taught.
On the battlefield the day before, the warriors dressed in armor and fought with giants and spearmen. If the spear breaks, they will continue to use the handle like a stick. If this weapon is lost, the warriors will fight with tachi (sword). Unless their sword is broken, they will now return to kumiuchi (wrestling) and rely on skills in jujutsu.

Obviously, these warriors live in an era that relying on only one martial arts skill will not be enough for them to survive the battle. Therefore, the diverse knowledge of Katori Shinto-ryu is undoubtedly a result of artistic creation in an era where this type of fighting is still popular.